Classroom – German

German A2: Reading and Writing

German A2: Reading and Writing Texts for beginners include simple sentences with basic vocabulary. More advanced texts feature complex sentences with relative and subordinate clauses and wider use of tenses. Our innovative teaching system clearly indicates the vocabulary level in each [...]

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German Alphabets : An overview

German Alphabets : An overview

German A to Z German has often been viewed by non-Germans as a harsh sounding language. That may be due in part to the more guttural pronunciation of certain German alphabet sounds and diphthongs and perhaps even a still lingering effect of old [...]

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German Personal Pronouns: How to use them?

German Personal Pronouns: How to use them?

  How to use Personal Pronouns in German? German personal pronouns (ich, sie, er, es, du, wir, and more) work in much the same way as their English equivalents (I, she, he, it, you, we, etc.). When you study verbs, you should already understand pronouns well. [...]

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Use of hin and her in German

Hin or her? The adverbs hin and her cause much confusion for German learners. There are no direct equivalents of either of these in English and to English speakers they often seem superfluous in a sentence. German in fact signifies directional movement (vs. position) in [...]

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Irgend–Prefix in German

What are German indefinite pronouns? These are pronouns that do not indicate the gender or number of things/people discussed. To put it simply, they are those vague words like ‘somebody’, ‘everybody’, ‘a few’, and ‘some’. Why are these important to learn? [...]

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Use of “da” in German

DA- COMPOUNDS 1. Da– Compounds Note that the form dar– is used when the preposition begins with a vowel. 2. Some Common Da– Words Following are some commonly used da– words: dabei in the process, in this matter, there, at the same time, as well dadurch thereby, in doing so dafür instead, on the [...]

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Separable verbs in German

Separable verbs in German (Trennbare Verben) One of the things that is the most surprising (and exasperating) when you start learning German is the idea of a separable verb. We’re going to look at what they are and how to conjugate [...]

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Comparative and Superlative Adjectives in German

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives in German There are three adjective degrees in German: Positive (equality and inferiority comparatives) Comparative (superiority) Superlative Positive degree This is the unmodified adjective. Ich bin müde I am tired The comparative of equality and inferiority is formed with the positive degree: Comparative of equality Clauses of [...]

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German noun declension

German Regular Noun declension, n-declension and exceptions Capitalized Nouns One important thing as we get started: All nouns are written with the first letter capitalized. "the house" is written as "das Haus". Genders There are three genders in German: masculine (männlich), feminine (weiblich) and neuter (sächlich). Usually, the gender of a noun is determined [...]

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